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    Originally posted by blackfrancois View Post

    I would have thought you would appreciate that program changing alabama football and civil rights in the state in 1970 when the black players of USC crushed the all white crimson tide 42-21 in front of an all white birmingham crowd.


    https://www.espn.com/college-footbal...es-new-meaning

    SPOILERjk. I know you wouldn't appreciate that.

    SPOILER
    The irony of that story that nobody mentions is that the first Black player to trot out on the field for Alabama was a guy named John Mitchell. He made his appearance for Alabama in the 1971 opener against....

    USC.

    And ironically, Alabama's white boys and John Mitchell beat them because Bear Bryant secretly switched to the wishbone in fall practice and USC didn't know how to defend it.

    Alabama would roll all through the season and finally play against Nebraska in the Orange Bowl where Rich Glover, Johnny Rodgers, Willie Harper, Bill Olds and all those corn feed Yankee White boys and it was pretty much a repeat of that infamous game you referred to. Nebraska won 38-6.

    Comment


      Originally posted by NickZepp84 View Post

      The actual first domino was the OU/UGA case which was best for college football for sure.
      Yes and there were a few dominoes before the LHN too. Arkansas leaving for the SEC was the end of the SWC which then led to the original Big12.

      Comment


        Originally posted by Me And My Butt View Post

        Bwwaahhhaaaa. More likely the remnants of the PAC pick off 4 Big 12 schools.

        This would work for OU….Big 12 would vote to dissolve. We’re out penalty free.
        We can only hope you and your butt are correct about this. Please let it be!

        Comment


          Originally posted by Hermit View Post

          That's ends the wild speculation, for the time being.
          a few gems from that twitter thread...

          I hope this all ends with Hawaii somehow in the ACC
          4:00 PM · Jun 30, 2022·TweetDeck Web App

          We’re Only 2 years away from Lincoln Riley blaming a 6 hour plane ride for a 20-13 Friday night loss at Rutgers.

          UCLA to Rutgers, btw, is almost the same distance as Rutgers to Reykjanesbær, Iceland.

          Comment


            Originally posted by Jakel View Post
            Wow.. now...what must the awesome 5 star recruits be thinking now...eh? Enjoy 95% of your games East of the Mississippii and coupled with Northern states weather.. lofl.. wonder what their parents are thinking right about now... pants shitting
            I’m the case of one player, I remember his family hating the OU defensive coaches and then signing off for him to follow them to SUC. Bunch of critical thinking-type of folks.

            Comment


              Lincoln quit on us in September because of SEC. USC is gonna see him quit on them during two-a-days this summer because of B1G. Who do you think his agent is contacting today to show interest in a new job?

              Comment


                When the PAC, ACC and others rejected playoff expansion and rejected auto bids to an expanded playoff, that was the death knell for the PAC and maybe the ACC too.

                Comment


                  just a theory but could it be that usc needed a splash hire like Lincoln to get the attention of the big10, something that would say they were serious still about football and paying 11 million for a coach was their way of doing it?

                  Comment


                    I'm trying but failing to come up with a joke that has the following elements in it:

                    The head coach at OU takes a job at USC. OU leaves for the SEC. The head coach at USC is told that his team is joining the B1G. All of this transpires, and meanwhile, this asshole has not coached one down at USC. Get it?

                    sorry.

                    Comment


                      I'll enjoy watching sc in late november at Wisky or UM... Even NU gets kinda cold then. LMAO

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Ogreuahole View Post
                        If I were BIGXII I would go talk to O, UW, UU. Then go talk to ACC schools like Pitt (WV rival), GA Tech (connect UCF) and any other ACC school the SEC doesn’t want. Talk to FSU and Miami to cover bases. I would slow play AZ schools and take no one from CA.
                        I think the ACC buyout fee might be too high.
                        Live Free or Die!

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by SoonerHank View Post
                          When the PAC, ACC and others rejected playoff expansion and rejected auto bids to an expanded playoff, that was the death knell for the PAC and maybe the ACC too.
                          In this podcast, Dan Wetzel calls the PAC and ACC "dumbasses" for rejecting the 12 team playoff format.

                          Two Pac-12 powers shocked the college football world on Thursday as the UCLA Bruins and USC Trojans are headed to the Big Ten. What does this move spell for the Pac-12? Will the SEC counter and add more teams as well? Come join us in an hour plus of group therapy as we get through another massive shift in the sport we love.
                          Two Pac-12 powers shocked the college football world on Thursday as the UCLA Bruins and USC Trojans are headed to the Big Ten. What does this move spell for the Pac-12? Will the SEC counter and add more teams as well? Come join us in an hour plus of group therapy as we get through another massive sh…
                          Live Free or Die!

                          Comment


                            Originally posted by soonerBAS View Post
                            just a theory but could it be that usc needed a splash hire like Lincoln to get the attention of the big10, something that would say they were serious still about football and paying 11 million for a coach was their way of doing it?
                            I don’t know that that’s the case, but it would be really funny if the whole time Riley was sneaking around behind OU’s back, USC was talking with the B1G behind his back. I have a tough time believing he takes that job if he knows he is playing a B1G schedule before OU plays an SEC schedule.

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by AppySooner View Post

                              I don’t know that that’s the case, but it would be really funny if the whole time Riley was sneaking around behind OU’s back, USC was talking with the B1G behind his back. I have a tough time believing he takes that job if he knows he is playing a B1G schedule before OU plays an SEC schedule.
                              Clearly sc and ucla only knew about this on thursday morning, snap decision.

                              Comment


                                Originally posted by MJSooner View Post
                                I hope somebody remembered to ask the Rose Bowl if it was okay.
                                Keith Jackson is spinning in his grave

                                Comment


                                  Originally posted by traxx View Post
                                  Lincoln quit on us in September because of SEC. USC is gonna see him quit on them during two-a-days this summer because of B1G. Who do you think his agent is contacting today to show interest in a new job?
                                  It won't be a college job. Dallas is my guess. I could see another underwhelming season with McCarthy in the next year or two, and Jerry making an offer. Of course, all bets are off if Sean Payton still wants to coach.



                                  Comment


                                    Originally posted by Stinger_1066 View Post

                                    I think the ACC buyout fee might be too high.
                                    Bingo. Notre Dame would have to pay $120-140 million to get out. Plus, in their agreement it stipulates that if ND wants to join a conference, then it has to be the ACC.

                                    Comment


                                      Originally posted by Tobias 2.0 View Post

                                      It won't be a college job. Dallas is my guess. I could see another underwhelming season with McCarthy in the next year or two, and Jerry making an offer. Of course, all bets are off if Sean Payton still wants to coach.


                                      Last year DCs began figuring out LR’s RPO Offense with zone coverages thereby eliminating the long passing game. Will see if he is capable of evolving. If not, he will be seen as a one trick pony.

                                      Comment


                                        Originally posted by Stinger_1066 View Post

                                        I think the ACC buyout fee might be too high.
                                        If enough teams decide the SEC or B1g are better for the future they may do away with it.

                                        Comment


                                          I think this helps USC and UCLA recruiting. They can both now offer something none of the other schools in that region can offer. They should be able to get the top Cali talent.

                                          And it cuts the legs out from under Dan Lanning at Oregon. Which I'd heard, he was making waves in Cali recruiting .

                                          It would not surprise me, if both USC and UCLA have some agreement with the Big 10 to not let another west coast school in the conference. Same thing that A&M doesn't want OU or UT in the SEC. They wanted that recruiting edge all to themselves.

                                          Comment


                                            This has always been true...

                                            /

                                            Comment


                                              Adding to the what ifs. if OU had not been chained to OSU and joined the Pac 12 when that idea was floated around a couple of years ago and had been joined by Texas.
                                              Perhaps the Pac 10/12/14/16 would have survived.
                                              Will this the Big 10 additions stymie CA recruiting by OU or is Brent shying away from that area?

                                              Comment


                                                Originally posted by Hermit View Post
                                                I think this helps USC and UCLA recruiting. They can both now offer something none of the other schools in that region can offer. They should be able to get the top Cali talent.

                                                And it cuts the legs out from under Dan Lanning at Oregon. Which I'd heard, he was making waves in Cali recruiting .

                                                It would not surprise me, if both USC and UCLA have some agreement with the Big 10 to not let another west coast school in the conference. Same thing that A&M doesn't want OU or UT in the SEC. They wanted that recruiting edge all to themselves.
                                                Oregon won't get left out, they'll have a seat in this at some point, probably sooner than later.

                                                Comment


                                                  Originally posted by soonerBAS View Post
                                                  just a theory but could it be that usc needed a splash hire like Lincoln to get the attention of the big10, something that would say they were serious still about football and paying 11 million for a coach was their way of doing it?
                                                  This decision wasn’t made because of who they hired for HC. It’s way bigger than that. This move was made because USC/UCLA don’t want to fall farther behind financially and the B1G covets the LA market and expansion.

                                                  It’s about a whole lotta money and the survival of 2 Cali schools. The PAC is dead.

                                                  Comment


                                                    Comment


                                                      USC and UCLA to the Big Ten? Phooey!


                                                      Like Texas and Oklahoma to the SEC, the USC-UCLA money-grab is reducing college football to a game of turf wars. There is a better way. UCLA and USC to the Big Ten? From where I sit, this makes about as much sense as Texas and Oklahoma to the SEC. Like the Longhorn-Sooner shocker, which gutted the Big 12, the UCLA-USC bolt cuts the heart out of the Pac-12. For what? Big television dollars. Once you get past all the highfalutin chatter, that’s what these moves are all about.

                                                      A lot of experts will tell you that once the SEC lassoed Texas and Oklahoma, the Big Ten needed to respond—or be left behind. I will tell you that the SEC and the Big Ten ought to be leading college football, which drives all college athletics, to a place that makes all college athletics better. They should not solely be engaged in an arms race for television dollars. Now, that said, they can still do that. It won’t be as easy now—because of all the animosity and hurt feelings generated by raiding some of the most attractive schools from other conferences. The madness needs to stop. From poaching schools, to handing out fistfuls of dollars to athletes under the Name, Image and Likeness chicanery, to coaches receiving contracts bigger than the GNP of developing nations, to players jumping through the portal at the drop of a two-deep chart—college athletics are bursting with Me-First selfishness.

                                                      There’s always going to be an element of that. Actually, there’s always going to be a lot of that. I love the anarchy and innovation in college sports, where the right coach can come up with offenses and defenses that surprise and fascinate those of us who crave dramatic football and basketball. Pro sports lack the college spirit and craziness to do that. They are too talent-based, too tied to strict financial realities. Anarchy and innovation on the field are wonderful. They inspire. But when the only rule to building a conference is ``follow the money,’’ that is absolutely not good. What’s next? Maybe the SEC and Big Ten mega-schools decide they don’t want to share. Why should Vanderbilt and Northwestern and Missouri and Rutgers get the same bloated check as Alabama and Ohio State, the schools that drive the TV money machine? Adios, amigos.

                                                      Here’s the other thing. It sounds enticing to have a conference lineup filled with powerhouse schools. But guess what? A lot of them are going to discover that those dreams of glory now can easily end up with a nightmare of disappointment. So now the SEC and Big Ten have a fistful of national-champion contenders who are inevitably going to be disappointed. Unlike eye-popping television contracts, Won-Lost records are a zero-sum equation. When Texas and Alabama play, somebody is going to lose. When Ohio State and USC face each other, somebody is going to lose. Take it right on down the line. So what’s the remedy? SEC commissioner Greg Sankey and his Big Ten counterpart, Kevin Warren, need to initiate a plan to restore some sanity to college athletics. They need to include not only their conference members, but also other major-conference teams—and some qualified minor-conference teams—and come up with a national organization plan. It doesn’t need to be everybody who raises their hand. But it should include the schools who have the resources, the drawing power and the commitment to play big-time football.

                                                      The NCAA is in way over its head when it comes to this. I have long believed college football was headed toward four super-conferences. It needs that move now more than ever. Skeptics will say the SEC and Big Ten have shown they don’t care about anybody else. Why would they invite others to their gluttonous party? Two reasons. 1) If they all get together, they can drive up the value of college football to television partners. Sure, this stuff gets tiered. Top games are worth more. But if you look at the immense broadcasting pies that the NFL and the NCAA basketball tournament bake, an alliance of all the serious college-football programs could generate a scary amount of revenue—from broadcasting and every other source of sports marketing.

                                                      Interestingly, the two commissioners who have been left holding the bag, the Pac-12’s George Kliavkoff and new Big 12 honcho Brett Yormark, are experts at the marketing/money side of big-time sports. ACC commissioner Jim Phillips, who has spent a lifetime figuring out how to make college athletics a win-win for everyone, including boosters and fans, also has the skill-set to bring everybody to the table and stop the madness. 2) It is absolutely the right thing to do. The poaching, the money-grabbing, the utter disregard for decades of sportsmanship and rivalries and traditions has to stop. USC and UCLA to the Big Ten sounds like a glitzy response to the SEC’s eye-popping addition of Texas and Oklahoma.

                                                      Super-sized, unwieldy conferences may create epic revenue streams. But they are not good for competition. And they are not good for fans of competition. Stop acting like mobsters carving out territory. Start acting like grownups who care about athletics with level playing fields that everyone can enjoy and admire. There will be just as much money in that. Maybe more.






                                                      https://www.star-telegram.com/sports...263084693.html

                                                      Comment


                                                        Originally posted by Ruprecht View Post
                                                        the first Black player to trot out on the field for Alabama was a guy named John Mitchell. He made his appearance for Alabama in the 1971 opener against USC. Alabama's white boys and John Mitchell beat them because Bear Bryant secretly switched to the wishbone in fall practice and USC didn't know how to defend it. Alabama would roll all through the season and finally play against Nebraska in the Orange Bowl.
                                                        not quite the team for So Cal in '71. preseason nbr 5 and finished 20th. tied ucla and lost four games, including to OU. it was another 200 yd day for Pruitt -- he had three of them that year (nearly five).

                                                        but it was a really good season for Oklahoma.

                                                        too bad we couldn't have played the tide instead of their little barn bro.

                                                        Pat Sullivan over Greg Pruitt for the Heisman?? smfh. that's worse than charles white in '79.

                                                        Comment


                                                          Report: Pac-12 to ‘explore all expansion options’ in wake of USC, UCLA departures


                                                          The Pac-12 conference is in full damage-control mode on Friday after the craziest day in the history of the conference took place with the USC Trojans and UCLA Bruins announcing their departure to the Big Ten on Thursday morning.


                                                          The plan for both Los Angeles schools to leave the Pac-12 was finalized on Thursday night and will take place in 2024. With that bit of information now confirmed, the Pac-12 is left trying to salvage what they can. At the moment, there are rumblings that teams throughout the conference are looking to jump a sinking ship and potentially land in the Big Ten with USC and UCLA, or maybe venture over to the Big-12 if possible.

                                                          According to Bruce Feldman, the Pac-12 is exploring all expansion options going forward.

                                                          The Pac-12 announces: "The Pac-12 Board met this morning and authorized the Conference to explore all expansion options. The 10 university presidents and chancellors remain committed to a shared mission of academic and athletic excellence on behalf of our student-athletes."
                                                          — Bruce Feldman (@BruceFeldmanCFB) July 1, 2022



                                                          Ironically, “expansion” doesn’t seem like the right word for what the Pac-12 should be doing. Rather, I would call it a potential “merging” with the Big-12, or maybe rebranding. I don’t see a world where the Pac-12 — or Pac-10 now? — stays under the same name and brings a slew of new teams into the fold. Not when teams like the Oregon Ducks, Washington Huskies, and potentially the Utah Utes are looking to jump ship and find a strong conference to play in.


                                                          Like we said, it’s full damage-control mode at this point. We will see where the pieces land over the coming hours and days.



                                                          https://sports.yahoo.com/report-pac-...185656812.html

                                                          Comment


                                                            Originally posted by Sooner in SoCal View Post

                                                            Clearly sc and ucla only knew about this on thursday morning, snap decision.
                                                            The B1G commissioner scheduled a spur of the moment Zoom call with the USC and UCLA athletic directors, and 45 minutes later it was a done deal.

                                                            Originally posted by Hermit View Post
                                                            I think this helps USC and UCLA recruiting. They can both now offer something none of the other schools in that region can offer. They should be able to get the top Cali talent.

                                                            And it cuts the legs out from under Dan Lanning at Oregon. Which I'd heard, he was making waves in Cali recruiting .

                                                            It would not surprise me, if both USC and UCLA have some agreement with the Big 10 to not let another west coast school in the conference. Same thing that A&M doesn't want OU or UT in the SEC. They wanted that recruiting edge all to themselves.
                                                            Originally posted by Nirvana Norman View Post

                                                            Oregon won't get left out, they'll have a seat in this at some point, probably sooner than later.
                                                            The biggest losers I see in this are Lanning / Oregon, Nebraska and Notre Dame.

                                                            Live Free or Die!

                                                            Comment


                                                              I guess this is cryptic enough

                                                              Comment


                                                                Originally posted by Mazeppa View Post
                                                                USC and UCLA to the Big Ten? Phooey!


                                                                Like Texas and Oklahoma to the SEC, the USC-UCLA money-grab is reducing college football to a game of turf wars. There is a better way. UCLA and USC to the Big Ten? From where I sit, this makes about as much sense as Texas and Oklahoma to the SEC. Like the Longhorn-Sooner shocker, which gutted the Big 12, the UCLA-USC bolt cuts the heart out of the Pac-12. For what? Big television dollars. Once you get past all the highfalutin chatter, that’s what these moves are all about.

                                                                A lot of experts will tell you that once the SEC lassoed Texas and Oklahoma, the Big Ten needed to respond—or be left behind. I will tell you that the SEC and the Big Ten ought to be leading college football, which drives all college athletics, to a place that makes all college athletics better. They should not solely be engaged in an arms race for television dollars. Now, that said, they can still do that. It won’t be as easy now—because of all the animosity and hurt feelings generated by raiding some of the most attractive schools from other conferences. The madness needs to stop. From poaching schools, to handing out fistfuls of dollars to athletes under the Name, Image and Likeness chicanery, to coaches receiving contracts bigger than the GNP of developing nations, to players jumping through the portal at the drop of a two-deep chart—college athletics are bursting with Me-First selfishness.

                                                                There’s always going to be an element of that. Actually, there’s always going to be a lot of that. I love the anarchy and innovation in college sports, where the right coach can come up with offenses and defenses that surprise and fascinate those of us who crave dramatic football and basketball. Pro sports lack the college spirit and craziness to do that. They are too talent-based, too tied to strict financial realities. Anarchy and innovation on the field are wonderful. They inspire. But when the only rule to building a conference is ``follow the money,’’ that is absolutely not good. What’s next? Maybe the SEC and Big Ten mega-schools decide they don’t want to share. Why should Vanderbilt and Northwestern and Missouri and Rutgers get the same bloated check as Alabama and Ohio State, the schools that drive the TV money machine? Adios, amigos.

                                                                Here’s the other thing. It sounds enticing to have a conference lineup filled with powerhouse schools. But guess what? A lot of them are going to discover that those dreams of glory now can easily end up with a nightmare of disappointment. So now the SEC and Big Ten have a fistful of national-champion contenders who are inevitably going to be disappointed. Unlike eye-popping television contracts, Won-Lost records are a zero-sum equation. When Texas and Alabama play, somebody is going to lose. When Ohio State and USC face each other, somebody is going to lose. Take it right on down the line. So what’s the remedy? SEC commissioner Greg Sankey and his Big Ten counterpart, Kevin Warren, need to initiate a plan to restore some sanity to college athletics. They need to include not only their conference members, but also other major-conference teams—and some qualified minor-conference teams—and come up with a national organization plan. It doesn’t need to be everybody who raises their hand. But it should include the schools who have the resources, the drawing power and the commitment to play big-time football.

                                                                The NCAA is in way over its head when it comes to this. I have long believed college football was headed toward four super-conferences. It needs that move now more than ever. Skeptics will say the SEC and Big Ten have shown they don’t care about anybody else. Why would they invite others to their gluttonous party? Two reasons. 1) If they all get together, they can drive up the value of college football to television partners. Sure, this stuff gets tiered. Top games are worth more. But if you look at the immense broadcasting pies that the NFL and the NCAA basketball tournament bake, an alliance of all the serious college-football programs could generate a scary amount of revenue—from broadcasting and every other source of sports marketing.

                                                                Interestingly, the two commissioners who have been left holding the bag, the Pac-12’s George Kliavkoff and new Big 12 honcho Brett Yormark, are experts at the marketing/money side of big-time sports. ACC commissioner Jim Phillips, who has spent a lifetime figuring out how to make college athletics a win-win for everyone, including boosters and fans, also has the skill-set to bring everybody to the table and stop the madness. 2) It is absolutely the right thing to do. The poaching, the money-grabbing, the utter disregard for decades of sportsmanship and rivalries and traditions has to stop. USC and UCLA to the Big Ten sounds like a glitzy response to the SEC’s eye-popping addition of Texas and Oklahoma.

                                                                Super-sized, unwieldy conferences may create epic revenue streams. But they are not good for competition. And they are not good for fans of competition. Stop acting like mobsters carving out territory. Start acting like grownups who care about athletics with level playing fields that everyone can enjoy and admire. There will be just as much money in that. Maybe more.






                                                                https://www.star-telegram.com/sports...263084693.html
                                                                The writer says that he has always expected 4 major conferences. Then he says that the SEC and B1G are way over the top and too large.

                                                                Math problem for the writer: If there are four major conferences and 64 major teams, how many teams are in each conference? Answer: BINGO 16.

                                                                But, 16 is too big, too way over the top, too large.... What an idiot that writer is!

                                                                Comment


                                                                  Comment


                                                                    Big Ten college football power rankings: Where USC, UCLA would rate if they joined in 2022


                                                                    Southern California and UCLA won’t be joining the Big Ten until 2024, which gives the Trojans and Bruins two years to get ready for the difference in college football styles with the move from the Pac-12.

                                                                    By that point, USC might be ready to roll into a New Year’s Six bowl under coach Lincoln Riley. UCLA has made progress under coach Chip Kelly and may have cracked into permanent Top 25 status.

                                                                    There’s always the chance the Big Ten isn’t done expanding and adds two or more teams into the mix by the 2024 season.

                                                                    But let's say USC and UCLA were stepping right into the conference this August. How would the Trojans and Bruins fare against some of the top heavyweights in the Football Bowl Subdivision?

                                                                    Here's a glimpse at the Big Ten power rankings with the newcomers included, weighing factors such as recent success, current program prestige and the odds of winning the conference championship in 2022.


                                                                    1. Ohio State

                                                                    There are two teams capable of stepping right into the Big Ten and unseating the Buckeyes from atop the conference. Those teams: Alabama and Georgia. The Trojans and Bruins aren’t doing that in 2022. (And maybe not ever.)


                                                                    2. Michigan

                                                                    The defending conference champions are going to control things along the line of scrimmage on offense. Keep an eye on quarterback: Cade McNamara is the incumbent starter, but youngster J.J. McCarthy may be too good to keep on the sidelines. Even if the defense takes a step against the run, the Wolverines are good enough to repeat atop the Big Ten and reach the College Football Playoff.


                                                                    3. Penn State

                                                                    The Nittany Lions will bounce back and contend for the top spot among the league’s potent second tier of teams. Bringing in former Miami (Fla.) coach Manny Diaz as defensive coordinator is one of the most impactful offseason hires in the Power Five.


                                                                    4. Michigan State

                                                                    Having taken a big leap back into playoff contention under Mel Tucker, the Spartans look to build off last year’s breakthrough. Quarterback Payton Thorne is the most underrated passer in the Big Ten and the new face of the offense with running back Kenneth Walker III off to the NFL.


                                                                    5. Wisconsin

                                                                    The Badgers must upgrade a middling passing game to contend along the league’s top four. But Wisconsin does look like the best team in a deep and likely competitive Big Ten West, where at least five teams are anticipating seven or more wins in the regular season and at least three can make a valid argument for reaching the conference championship game.


                                                                    6. Southern California

                                                                    Southern California head coach Lincoln Riley talks with his quarterbacks during a March practice.
                                                                    USC could very well win the Pac-12 in Riley’s debut should the offense click behind star quarterback Caleb Williams and wide receiver Jordan Addison. Depth is a major problem, however, and the lack of experienced bodies across the board would be a big issue in the grind of Big Ten play. The guess: USC would win seven or eight games as a member of the conference, feasting on the bottom half of the league but not matching up well with Ohio State, Michigan and the best of the best.


                                                                    7. Iowa

                                                                    Iowa’s a lock for bowl play and should spend much of the year at least on the fringes of the USA TODAY Sports Coaches Poll. That might be selling the Hawkeyes short. Like Wisconsin, the offense has to get more at quarterback to take advantage of possible All-America tight end Sam LaPorta and very promising young receiver Keagan Johnson.


                                                                    8. UCLA

                                                                    UCLA quarterback Dorian Thompson-Robinson returns as a super senior, bolstering Chip Kelly's offense.
                                                                    Look for the Bruins to start the year on many preseason Top 25 lists. Like the rival Trojans, UCLA is poised to make a strong push for the Pac-12 South Division crown, the conference championship and a New Year’s Six bowl. Admittedly, it’s been a slog to get here: Kelly won three, four and three games in his first three seasons before last year’s eight-win finish. The Bruins should match that total in the Pac-12. The guess: They would land more in the seven-win range in this year’s Big Ten.


                                                                    9. Nebraska

                                                                    The boom-or-bust Cornhuskers have put faith in a number of Power Five transfers to change the program’s trajectory under coach Scott Frost. The biggest addition is former Texas quarterback Casey Thompson, who can lock down the starting job in preseason camp. If everything works, this team could win the West; if it’s more of the same, look for four or five wins.


                                                                    10. Minnesota

                                                                    Minnesota needs to rebuild up front without four of last season’s starting offensive linemen. (Though the one returning starter, center John Michael Schmitz, is a fantastic building block.) While those personnel losses are concerning, the Gophers will get a boost from the return of former offensive coach Kirk Ciarrocca, who previously held the position from 2017-19.


                                                                    11. Purdue

                                                                    Purdue won’t rise to the top of the Big Ten West without taking a big step forward on defense, which seems unlikely. Aidan O’Connell and the Boilermakers’ offense will carry this team to six or seven wins, however, and it’s not hard to see Purdue knock off Iowa or Wisconsin during the regular season and shake up the divisional race.


                                                                    12. Maryland

                                                                    A brutal November — starting with Wisconsin and Penn State on the road and Ohio State at home — means Maryland needs to hit the ground running in September and October to secure another bowl bid. Good thing the schedule could allow for a 6-2 start.



                                                                    13. Rutgers

                                                                    The defense has miles to go before simply joining the middle of the pack in the Big Ten. Last year’s group gave up 7.1 yards per play against opponents with a winning record, fourth-worst among teams in the Power Five. Greg Schiano might coax six wins out of this group, but it’ll be close.


                                                                    14. Illinois

                                                                    It’s still early in the rebuilding process for coach Bret Bielema. But there were very positive signs coming out of his debut: Illinois won four games in conference play, including an epic overtime win against Penn State and a physical road victory against Minnesota. His second team could improve but still top out at four or five wins.


                                                                    15. Northwestern

                                                                    Pat Fitzgerald has suffered back-to-back losing seasons just once since taking over at Northwestern in 2006. Three times in the past decade he’s taken a losing team to a Top 25 finish the following year — in 2012, 2015 and 2020. Serious personnel questions on both sides of the ball make a similar leap this season highly unlikely. So does the schedule, which includes crossover games against Penn State and Ohio State.


                                                                    16. Indiana

                                                                    Any one of the bottom four teams could end up as the caboose of the Big Ten. Let’s go with Indiana even if the Hoosiers and coach Tom Allen are not far removed from one of the top seasons in modern program history.





                                                                    https://sports.yahoo.com/big-ten-col...183928967.html

                                                                    Comment


                                                                      With USC, UCLA bound for Big Ten, college sports becomes another corporate proxy war | Opinion



                                                                      It has never been the transfer portal or giving the kids some money that was going to make college sports fundamentally worse, less fun and more corporate.

                                                                      It was always going to be the proxy war between ESPN and Fox and the soulless college presidents and administrators who have been sucking on their teat for the last decade, unable to do anything remotely visionary with their sport besides convince television executives to shovel more money at them every decade.

                                                                      And now here we are, at the precipice of a realignment that will not merely be about rearranging pieces on the chess board. This, finally, is the Big One: The ultimate abandonment of tradition, of rivalry, of geographic sanity and of the unique character that distinguished one conference from another.

                                                                      In the end, we’ll still have the Big Ten and the SEC standing atop college sports, but they will no longer be college athletic conferences in the same way we’ve known them for a century. Now, with USC and UCLA abandoning their West Coast roots for the riches of a league that was founded in 1896 by a group of college presidents in the Midwest trying to establish some control over college athletics, they are headed for a future as generic, soulless corporate entities that exist purely for profit and excess. The future of the SEC vs. Big Ten will look no different than Coke vs. Pepsi, FedEx vs. UPS and Apple vs. IBM.

                                                                      And college sports is never going to be the same.

                                                                      This has been building quickly over the last dozen years, starting with the Big Ten’s foray into Nebraska and subsequent poaching of Maryland and Rutgers when it came time to negotiate a new TV contract. The Pac-12 tried, and failed, to crush the Big 12, settling instead for Colorado and Utah. But the instability from that exploration never went away, and shortly thereafter the SEC pounced, taking Texas A&M and Missouri. The ACC, having lost a founding member in Maryland, struck a fatal blow to the old Big East by adding Pittsburgh, Syracuse and Louisville, while giving Notre Dame a home for its non-football sports.

                                                                      Meanwhile everyone else cobbled things together the best they could, administrators hoping the next big earthquake wouldn't happen until their 401ks got fat enough for them to get out of this ridiculous business.

                                                                      The uneasy détente lasted until a year ago when word leaked that Texas and Oklahoma were headed to the SEC. After that, it was only a matter of time until what we saw Thursday. Apocalypse, now.

                                                                      It’s hard to predict how exactly it will happen, but it will happen all the same. The Big Ten’s addition of USC and UCLA as early as 2024 — made official by an acceptance vote Thursday — opens the door to the future that everyone in college sports figured was coming but hoped might somehow be averted. It may go fast, or it may come in drips and drabs, but the free-for-all to get into either the SEC or the Big Ten is going to make "Squid Games" look like child’s play.

                                                                      When there’s potentially $100 million annually on the line, climbing over dead bodies is just part of the deal.

                                                                      Remember, in the wake of the SEC’s power play last year, the commissioners of the Big Ten, Pac-12 and ACC announced a so-called “Alliance" that was supposed to stabilize college sports in the midst of television negotiations and College Football Playoff expansion. Asked if the leagues had put anything on paper to, you know, prevent poaching from each other, Pac-12 commissioner George Kliavkoff said it was an “agreement between three gentlemen.”

                                                                      Perhaps in retrospect, it was two gentlemen and one henchman. That would be Kevin Warren, the Big Ten commissioner that fans of the league (and many administrators within the league) had dismissed as a weak link given his clumsy handling of COVID-19 in the summer of 2020 when he announced that the football season would be delayed until spring and then reversed course when the SEC, ACC and Big 12 held firm that the season would be played in the fall.

                                                                      As it turns out, Warren has a ruthless streak. And even if it was indeed USC and UCLA approaching the Big Ten rather than the other way around, as people within the Big Ten insist, the knife in the back cuts all the same.



                                                                      https://sports.yahoo.com/usc-ucla-bo...232841641.html

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                                                                        https://twitter.com/johncanzanobft/status/

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                                                                          Originally posted by NickZepp84 View Post
                                                                          PAC 10 +2 -2 > Big 12 -4 +2 -2 +4

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                                                                            https://twitter.com/wilnerhotline/status/

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                                                                              Has Socalisooner chimed in on this yet?

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                                                                                Originally posted by SoonernVolved View Post
                                                                                https://twitter.com/wilnerhotline/status/
                                                                                No argument with the tweet, but the Big 12 is in the position to better itself by adding actual flagship schools over public universities named after their city (not talking about private schools). If the Big 12 thinks they are going to weather this new storm by sitting idle, they better rethink their strategy and work on partnering with flagship schools in the PAC, or you'll see teams slated to join the Big 12 opting to go elsewhere since they're not really on the hook for a substantial exit fee.

                                                                                I don't know shit about much, but the new Big 12 commissioner should be working the phones and scheduling face-to-face meetings with PAC schools still dazed by the oak stick USC whapped them upside the head with.

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                                                                                  Originally posted by MichSooner View Post

                                                                                  The writer says that he has always expected 4 major conferences. Then he says that the SEC and B1G are way over the top and too large.

                                                                                  Math problem for the writer: If there are four major conferences and 64 major teams, how many teams are in each conference? Answer: BINGO 16.

                                                                                  But, 16 is too big, too way over the top, too large.... What an idiot that writer is!
                                                                                  The writer of that article is indeed an idiot. Sure, programs in contention for championships are at a higher risk of dropping games, but marquee matchups are what people want to watch. Networks boosting these universities into the monetary stratosphere have to provide programming viewers will tune into. Also, expanding the playoff gives these 'championship-caliber' teams a margin of error to drop a game or two due to the strength of the schedule.

                                                                                  I don't know about the rest of you, but Oklahoma vs. Alabama seems much more intriguing than TCU vs. Kansas.

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                                                                                    https://twitter.com/BourbonGator84/status/

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                                                                                      Originally posted by SoonernVolved View Post
                                                                                      https://twitter.com/wilnerhotline/status/
                                                                                      That would be dumb. They can have two schools in each state in a conference that doesn't matter OR they MIGHT be able to have one school in each state in the conference that matters. If legal roadblocks are made, they're guaranteeing the former.

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                                                                                        Originally posted by SoonernVolved View Post
                                                                                        https://twitter.com/johncanzanobft/status/
                                                                                        Yeah, that really worked in Oklahoma.

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                                                                                          If the PAC and Big 12 want to survive the best thing to do is merge into a giant conference. Will it work? Probably till the second the SEC or Big 10 add teams they want from it. We could be at a limit where the SEC and Big 10 decide not to add anymore teams unless ND joins one.

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                                                                                            Originally posted by Stella Link View Post

                                                                                            Yeah, that really worked in Oklahoma.
                                                                                            IDK what those states laws say about this, but different states have different laws about how their states universities are controlled.
                                                                                            Per the states constitution as amended in 1941 the Oklahoma the law is very clear. There wasn't anything the state could do to block OU's exit from the BIG 12. OU was always free to leave osu in spite of what was reported by some in our local sports media.
                                                                                            In Texas, if they have the political will to do so, the state of Texas can block / impact the conference moves of their state's universities.

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                                                                                              Originally posted by OU48A View Post
                                                                                              IDK what those states laws say about this, but different states have different laws about how their states universities are controlled.
                                                                                              Per the states constitution as amended in 1941 the Oklahoma the law is very clear. There wasn't anything the state could do to block OU's exit from the BIG 12. OU was always free to leave osu in spite of what was reported by some in our local sports media.
                                                                                              In Texas, if they have the political will to do so, the state of Texas can block / impact the conference moves of their state's universities.
                                                                                              Oklahoma State joined the Big 8 in 1957. OU joined in 1920. Certainly not joined at the hip.

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                                                                                                Originally posted by Sooner in SoCal View Post

                                                                                                Clearly sc and ucla only knew about this on thursday morning, snap decision.
                                                                                                Winner, Post of the Day.

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                                                                                                  Originally posted by OU48A View Post
                                                                                                  IDK what those states laws say about this, but different states have different laws about how their states universities are controlled.
                                                                                                  Per the states constitution as amended in 1941 the Oklahoma the law is very clear. There wasn't anything the state could do to block OU's exit from the BIG 12. OU was always free to leave osu in spite of what was reported by some in our local sports media.
                                                                                                  In Texas, if they have the political will to do so, the state of Texas can block / impact the conference moves of their state's universities.
                                                                                                  Kansas

                                                                                                  https://www2.kusports.com/news/2021/...-ku-k-state-d/

                                                                                                  Approval from Board of Regents a requirement if KU, K-State desire to negotiate moving into new conference


                                                                                                  By Matt Tait


                                                                                                  Photo by Matt Tait

                                                                                                  The view of David Booth Kansas Memorial Stadium from the top of Campanile hill in July 2020.

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                                                                                                  As the future of the Big 12 Conference hangs in the balance, one thing is clear: The University of Kansas will need approval from the Kansas Board of Regents to make any type of move regarding its conference affiliation.

                                                                                                  That fact is spelled out in black and white in the Board of Regents’ bylaws and policies online.

                                                                                                  With Oklahoma and Texas formally requesting invitations to the SEC on Tuesday, the future of the conference and its eight remaining members appears to be uncertain.


                                                                                                  If moving on from the conference it has called home for nearly three decades is viewed as the right move for Kansas, KU would need to have the Board’s blessing to even begin discussing joining another conference.

                                                                                                  “Any change by a state university in its athletic conference membership shall require expedited Board Chairman and Board President and CEO approval before entering negotiations relative to such change,” the policy reads.

                                                                                                  That was not always the case, however. According to the minutes provided at their March 17 meeting, the policy on requiring BOR approval to begin negotiations was adopted in March of this year.

                                                                                                  No such policy existed the first time conference realignment hit college athletics back in 2011 and 2012.

                                                                                                  However, according to the minutes of a BOR meeting from December of 2020, the approval policy was first proposed to the Board more than 18 months ago.

                                                                                                  It surfaced again more recently in the minutes of a Jan. 20, 2021 meeting, with KU Chancellor Douglas Girod stating, according to the minutes of that meeting, that “these negotiations happen quickly and convening a Board meeting could be challenging.”

                                                                                                  According to the minutes, Girod told the Board in January that there were two reasons a university might look to leave its current conference: “Either because the institution is deciding to seek a new conference or it is because there are changes happening in its current conference.” The minutes indicate that Girod also explained to the Regents that there could be confidentiality concerns.

                                                                                                  According to the minutes, Girod ultimately said he supported the idea of informing the Board Chair, President and CEO of any such negotiations as outlined by the policy.

                                                                                                  The Journal-World reached out to both KU and the Board of Regents on Tuesday, seeking clarification on the origin of the policy. KU spokesman Joe Monaco referred the inquiries to the Board of Regents.

                                                                                                  Matt Keith, the Director of Communications for the Board of Regents, said the policy change originated in the Board’s Governance committee in late 2020 and was introduced because the Regents “wanted to provide additional Board oversight over athletic conference changes due to the significant impact conference membership has on a university.”

                                                                                                  Board of Regents chair Cheryl Harrison-Lee made note of the policy during a Monday statement regarding the current state of the Big 12.

                                                                                                  “The Regents recognize the importance of conference affiliation for the experience of all students and have Board policy to ensure that conference membership supports our strategic goals,” Harrison-Lee said in the statement. “Per that policy, if any state university wishes to change athletic conferences, the university CEO must obtain expedited approval from the Board Chair and President and CEO prior to entering any negotiations. This provides important Board oversight, while also protecting the time sensitive and confidential nature of these negotiations.”

                                                                                                  Harrison-Lee went on to express confidence in the fact that Girod and Kansas State President Richard Myers “will seek approval from Board leadership prior to beginning any negotiations. She added that the Board would inform the public of such requests “at the appropriate time.”

                                                                                                  Tuesday inquiries from the Journal-World to the Board of Regents about whether either school had requested such approval went unanswered.

                                                                                                  In her Monday statement, Harrison-Lee also said that the Board would continue to monitor the developments in the Big 12 and their impact on KU and K-State.

                                                                                                  “We will continue to work with the university leaders to prioritize the fiscal stability and academic standards of our universities consistent with the goals of our strategic plan to support Kansas families, businesses and economic prosperity,” the statement concluded.

                                                                                                  Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly, via a Monday statement from state officials, also added her take on the current uncertainty in the Big 12 shortly after Oklahoma and Texas officially announced that they would not be signing a grant of rights extension with the conference in 2025.

                                                                                                  On Tuesday, SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey was the first to announce that both OU and Texas had requested formal invitations into the SEC.

                                                                                                  “Governor Kelly appreciates the Big 12 remaining committed to the continued success both academically and athletically for members of the conference,” the statement began. “She and her office are in regular communication with KU, KSU, the Kansas Board of Regents and the Big 12 Conference to ensure our universities and the state of Kansas will be in the best possible position following the decision from UT and OU.”

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                                                                                                    Originally posted by Sooner in SoCal View Post
                                                                                                    I'll enjoy watching sc in late november at Wisky or UM... Even NU gets kinda cold then. LMAO
                                                                                                    This climate issue is way overblown, in my opinion. October and November typically provide glorious football weather in Madison, Ann Arbor, and Columbus--temperatures averaging from the 50's early in November to the mid-40's late. (And Lincoln, NE, is just as cold/temperate). I live on the Indiana/Michigan border, and I can see Notre Dame from here. Their '21 class of 27 included 10 guys from California, Florida, or Georgia--not bothered by the climate.

                                                                                                    A real issue concerns USC/UCLA fans. Are they going to travel to D.C. to play Maryland or to Newark to play Rutgers?

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                                                                                                      Originally posted by OUwasp View Post
                                                                                                      Has Socalisooner chimed in on this yet?
                                                                                                      I’d like to see Michigan and Ohio State in the rose bowl. Im
                                                                                                      sure they’d love to play out west too.

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