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    Safe…she’s safe

    Comment


      Boone is clearly safe!! Waiting for umps.

      Comment


        wow, these challenges tonight have been on point but why the umps so bad?

        Comment


          She is safe! Umps are 0 - 3 tonight.

          Comment


            Cans on the ears

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              That’s bullshit, she was safe.

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                What THE FUCK!!

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                  uhhh what

                  Comment


                    Unreal, umps call.out after replay and even ESPN can't believe it. Replay *clearly* shows Boone foot hits bag before 1st baseman catches ball. terrible call.

                    Comment


                      That’s pathetic

                      Comment


                        Ump gets paid by the hour.

                        Comment


                          I'd imagine Joe C. is already making calls to the big12 office.

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                            She was clearly safe.

                            Comment


                              Great play by Johns at third and throws runner out.

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                                Line drive to Johns, two down.

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                                  Johns whiffs on ground ball at third, batter reaches.

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                                    Grounder ends the inning.

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                                      Johns makes errors on basic plays then wows with a real good one. Elish is slow , no need to rush that play She was busy that inning LOL

                                      She should have 2 errors this game but the scorekeeper likes her...

                                      Comment


                                        Let’s get two and go home

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                                          Another walk. Alo up. Walk-off possible.

                                          Comment


                                            Alo walks. Winning run at first. No out

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                                              Ump has had an odd strike zone at times.

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                                                Strikeout for Jennings.

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                                                  Lyons at the plate.

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                                                    Double play ends the inning.

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                                                      Three outs and go home

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                                                        Steeerikeout. One down

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                                                          Ground ball from Bahl to first, two down.

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                                                            Ballgame. 7-1

                                                            Bahl with the K to end it.

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                                                              Ball game!

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                                                                Strikeout!!! BALLGAME!!

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                                                                  Way for Bahl to end the game!!!

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                                                                    Solid.

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                                                                      Best news is the pressure is off now. Just have to split to win the conference which is the main goal right now. We will for sure have an advantage on the mound tomorrow with Elish being injured.

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                                                                        Here's every play in 21 minutes. The blown call for an out where it should have been safe for Boone was glossed over. That is, no mention of the challenge and refusal to admit error by the umps:

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                                                                          Originally posted by Ruprecht View Post
                                                                          Best news is the pressure is off now. Just have to split to win the conference which is the main goal right now. We will for sure have an advantage on the mound tomorrow with Elish being injured.
                                                                          I don’t think Elish is pitching tomorrow or in this series. Recovery from a relatively minor arm injury and hopeful that she will be available for the tournament. They have a freshman Day I think is her name who has been really solid but I agree we should have an advantage.

                                                                          Comment


                                                                            https://twitter.com/OU_Softball/status/


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                                                                            1
                                                                            OSU

                                                                            7
                                                                            OU
                                                                            1 4 2
                                                                            7 6 1
                                                                            W: Bahl, Jordy (21-1) L: Maxwell, Kelly (15-3)

                                                                            Game Recap: Softball | May 05, 2022
                                                                            NO. 1 SOONERS TAKE GAME ONE OVER NO. 7 COWGIRLS
                                                                            NORMAN — No. 1 Oklahoma took game one of OU/OSU on Thursday over No. 7 Oklahoma State, 7-1.

                                                                            A four-run third inning broke things open for OU (46-1, 15-1 Big 12), with three runs coming off the bat of Tiare Jennings. The sophomore blasted her 22nd home run of the season and fourth in as many games.

                                                                            Freshman Jordy Bahl was again a force in the circle, throwing a four-hit complete game, allowing just one run and one walk with six strikeouts of the Cowgirl (38-10, 14-2) offense. Bahl is 21-1 on the year and collected her third top-10 win of the year.

                                                                            Six Sooners registered a hit in the game with Jennings bringing in a trio, senior Jocelyn Aloplating two and sophomore Jayda Colemanrecording one RBI.

                                                                            The win was OU's 27th in the past 28 games over OSU and with the victory, Oklahoma is one win away from winning its 10th consecutive and 14th overall Big 12 regular season title.

                                                                            After a quiet pair of innings, OU plated four runs on four hits in the third with all four runs coming with two outs. Following singles from super senior Jana Johns and Coleman, an RBI single to left center from Alo scored the first run of the game. The next at-bat, Jennings sent a three-run homer over the fence for OU's 121st home run of the year and the sophomore's 49th of her career.

                                                                            Oklahoma pushed two more across in the fourth via bases-loaded walks to Coleman and Alo.

                                                                            OSU scored their lone run of the game on an RBI single from Sydney Pennington at the top of the fifth on a ball that bounced off the third-base bag into left. OU got the run back quickly in the bottom half of the inning as senior captain Lynnsie Elam raced home on a Maxwell wild pitch.

                                                                            Bahl finished the Cowgirls in the final two innings, retiring six of the final seven batters with just one baserunner getting aboard on OU's only error of the contest. The Cowgirls made two errors in the game, with Maxwell allowing four earned runs and seven runs total with four strikeouts and six walks.

                                                                            Oklahoma hit a home run for the 41st game of the season out of 47, while the pitching staff allowed one run or fewer for the 41st time.

                                                                            The teams meet for game two on Friday at 6 p.m. CT with the game being aired on ESPN2. It can be heard on 107.7 The Franchise in Oklahoma and nationwide on The Varsity app.

                                                                            For updates and more information on Oklahoma softball, follow the Sooners on Twitter and Instagram (@OU_Softball) and like Oklahoma Softball on Facebook.

                                                                            Comment


                                                                              https://twitter.com/OU_Softball/status/

                                                                              Comment


                                                                                https://twitter.com/OUDailySports/status/


                                                                                OU softball: How family, fishing and failure fuels Jordy Bahl’s Michael Jordan-esque competitive fire

                                                                                Jordy Bahl paced around the circle and shook her head in disgust.

                                                                                OU’s star right-hander had just been called for an illegal pitch in the top of the first inning. Fired up, the freshman pitcher had one final chance to strike out UCLA’s Briana Perez on a 3-2 count and pass the first big test of her career.

                                                                                Bahl tossed an offspeed pitch past Perez’s flailing bat and then glared at the home plate umpire while pumping her fist and shouting “Thank you blue!”

                                                                                To those who know her best, the moment between pitches encapsulates how Bahl fuels herself in a sport where few can match her intensity. This season Bahl has posted a 0.96 earned run average and allowed just 59 hits in 123.2 innings pitched, while striking out 191 batters and becoming a finalist for USA Softball Player of the Year.

                                                                                As the top five matchup against the Bruins dragged on, so did the ump’s illegal pitch calls against Bahl’s unorthodox crow hop wind-up. Bahl was not discouraged, however, and mowed down 13 more batters to complete No. 1 Oklahoma’s Feb. 12 win over No. 3 UCLA in the Mary Nutter Classic.

                                                                                On a national stage, the 19-year-old former top-ranked recruit from Papillion, Nebraska, displayed the physical and mental tools fostered by her father, Dave Bahl. As a constant reminder of the killer mindset he instilled, she sports a pair of forearm tattoos that match Dave’s. Reflecting on those when she prepares to toe the rubber has helped make her indomitable in the circle.

                                                                                On Bahl’s right forearm the number 98 is scribbled in a small, bold font. It’s the number she wears now and the same Dave donned as a college football player 34 years ago. On Bahl’s left wrist are the letters G-T-N, an abbreviation from the father and daughter’s favorite movie, “300,” in which a famed warrior leading troops into battle says, “Give them nothing, but take from them everything.”

                                                                                Jordy and Dave’s bond extends to another legendary contender who manufactured motivation however possible — Michael Jordan. Dave grew up watching the Chicago Bulls standout as he dominated the NBA through the 1990s. Jordy came to idolize Jordan’s killer mindset as a child, and deepened that admiration when she watched “The Last Dance” Netflix documentary between games during a summer tournament in California.

                                                                                Throughout the tournament, Bahl was compelled by Jordan’s journey to his sixth NBA championship. Specifically, she loved how he played with a chip on his shoulder. Bahl already carried the same fiery edge and the documentary drove her to heighten and harness it, using it to elevate her game as Jordan did.

                                                                                Oklahoma pitcher Jordy Bahl watched "The Last Dance," a Netflix documentary about Michael Jordan, during a break from a summer travel tournament.

                                                                                Photo courtesy of Dave Bahl
                                                                                “She was enamored by just the insane competitiveness, and how (Jordan) would make the game personal,” Dave Bahl said of his daughter’s reaction to the documentary. “He was at his best when it was personal. Some of those rivalries were just personal anyway because of prior history, but sometimes he would have to go as far as to create a reason for it to be personal.”

                                                                                Fast forward over eight months, 46 games into her freshman campaign with OU, and Bahl still carries the same combative mindset that made Jordan arguably the greatest player of all time.

                                                                                Throughout this season, Bahl has tried to build an advantage over her opponents and even her OU teammates, like college softball’s home run queen Jocelyn Alo, who she regularly battles in practice.

                                                                                The young pitcher even exhibits similar nervous tendencies as Jordan, who famously flailed his tongue in clutch moments. Bahl gnaws on her bottom lip before and during games, drilling cold sores into the edges of her mouth. Two days before the Sooners’ matchup against then-No. 8 Kentucky on March 22, OU’s training staff even prescribed Bahl a numbing agent because the sores were so painful.

                                                                                “She’s working on trying to figure out ways to always have that edge,” Dave said. “I guess that's what you call a coping mechanism or something for her stress and anxiety.”

                                                                                This weekend, Bahl and OU (45-1, 14-1 Big 12) face OU/OSU rival No. 7 Oklahoma State (38-9, 14-1 Big 12) in a three-game series for the Big 12 regular season title, leading into the postseason and the Sooners’ bid for a second straight Women’s College World Series championship. As her first year in Norman nears its climax, Bahl’s ability to elevate herself as Jordan did will be one of the deciding factors in Oklahoma’s national championship defense.

                                                                                As the 2022 season continues, OU coach Patty Gasso is hunting for ways to enhance Bahl’s greatness.

                                                                                “I just have never seen anything like her,” Gasso said. “When she got onto our field, I was just still figuring her out. I'm trying to feed her competition. She wants it, and I want to feed into it. I'm really trying to do a good job at that practice.”

                                                                                ‘Her family means everything’

                                                                                At 7 on a July morning, Bahl slid downstairs to her basement, flicked on the lights of her family’s home gym and started the morning workout routine she committed to at the COVID-19 pandemic’s outset.

                                                                                The room, built by Dave, served as a training area for Jordy, who is now 19, and her brothers Bryson, Broden and Hayden, who are 15, 17 and 21, respectively. Along with a row of weights, benches and workout machines, a long hallway ends at a block wall scribbled with Sharpie Xs, dedicated for target practice in Bahl’s makeshift bullpen.

                                                                                Broden’s bedroom is also in the basement, and after climbing out of bed on three hours of sleep after a night of video games, he scolded Jordy for waking him up with her loud country music. Fed up, the pair hurled insults back and forth, before Broden issued a challenge.

                                                                                “I bet you can’t beat me in a race,” he said.

                                                                                Immediately, they sped outside to set up orange, plastic cones for a 40-yard sprint. Awakened by the commotion, Dave surveyed the impromptu race from the front porch.

                                                                                “Broden absolutely smoked her,” Dave said. “She doesn’t like to lose, so that was already 10 degrees of ugly right there. So, then Jordy said, ‘Well fine, I bet I can beat you in a long-distance race.’”

                                                                                After mapping out a two-block path for the second contest, Broden again won. Jordy, tapping into her Jordan-like pettiness, didn’t talk to her brother for nearly three weeks.

                                                                                Those races notwithstanding, Jordy usually holds her own against her brothers. Whether it was two-touch football — which quickly escalated to tackling — wiffle ball or pickup basketball, she always challenged them.

                                                                                “We go at each other pretty hard,” Hayden said. “Most of the time it ends up not ending too well because we go a little too hard. It’s just (that) competitive nature. It's in all of us, and it's been a little more difficult on her, being the only girl, because she's got three brothers to deal with, who maybe take it a little too far sometimes. But, she's always held her own in every regard.”

                                                                                Hayden formerly pitched for Nebraska-Omaha before retiring due to injury. Broden and Bryson are standouts on Papillion LaVista High School’s football and basketball teams, respectively.

                                                                                The origin of the siblings’ competitive nature lies with Dave, though. He played defensive line for NAIA Doane College in Crete, Nebraska, and is now a firefighter.

                                                                                Following 24-hour shifts at the station, Dave would get off at 7 a.m. and take Jordy to pitching lessons from age 7 to 16. There, Darren Dubsky, Jordy’s pitching coach for 11 years, directed her technique as Dave crouched 43-feet away, catching and recording notes for more practice at home.

                                                                                Dave also primarily helped his daughter with her illegal pitch troubles due to her plant foot leaping off the ground as she hurls her body into her windup. For months, the pair dug trenches in the ground to catch Jordy’s foot and ensure it stayed planted. If she hopped over a trench, Dave would call an illegal pitch, making her try again.

                                                                                Dave’s commitment to his kids runs deep, so much that his only listed hobby in his firefighter profile is “raising four children.” His efforts seep directly into their killer mindset, fueling competition between the three.

                                                                                “I noticed that she got a lot of that mental toughness from her family,” Dubsky said. “She just snowballs, and things tend to snowball the right way with her.”

                                                                                While Dave largely nurtured Jordy’s competitiveness, he also has helped her develop a persona beyond softball. After losing the high school state championship in 2018, Bahl struggled because she was so singularly focused to that point.

                                                                                “She started to have some difficulty with her identity,” Dave said. “At the time she was just a softball player. That's all people really knew her for and even dealt with some of that in her own family. (There were even) relatives that just couldn't be around her without talking softball.”

                                                                                Instantly, Dave looked to the things he enjoyed growing up — hunting, fishing and exploring the wilderness — as an outlet for his daughter’s emotions. Quickly, she started adopting those hobbies as an escape from the diamond.

                                                                                After taking up fishing with her dad, Bahl started to make a routine of it with some of her Nebraska Gold travel ball teammates before practices. Then, she’d trek from the lake to the Millard United Sports Championship Center in cowboy boots and a muddied uniform to dice up her teammates in the circle.

                                                                                Bahl also liked watching the Nebraska sunsets with her family. Now, being 468 miles south of her hometown, Bahl continues the hobbies her father started her on. She keeps a set of fishing poles in the bed of her red Ford F-150 with camo seats if she ever wants to cast a line with her Sooners teammates.

                                                                                Being on the biggest stage despite her freshness in college softball, Bahl is continuing to learn how to reel in her determination and cast it out at the appropriate times. But, that wouldn’t be possible without the lessons she learned from her father and family.

                                                                                “I think the family was probably the last puzzle piece that needed to take place in order for her to be great,” Dubsky said. “I think with Jordy, she feels in the back of her mind that she has such a close relationship with her family. … She knows that no matter what in life, everything's going to be fine. Her family means everything.”

                                                                                ‘She got hit pretty hard’

                                                                                With two outs remaining in the bottom of the sixth inning, Bahl peered from the dugout bench as her Papillion La Vista High School teammate waited for a pitch.

                                                                                With parents screaming in the background, Lincoln Southwest’s pitcher delivered and induced a groundout, stealing the 2018 Nebraska Class A Softball State Championship from Bahl’s squad.

                                                                                Entering the state title series, Bahl and the Monarchs were 34-0 before dropping both contests to Lincoln Southwest.

                                                                                A sophomore at the time, Bahl glared at the opposing team as they rushed to first base and hoisted the sterling trophy, a memory that burned inside her mind for most of her high school career.

                                                                                Bahl had led the Monarchs well for most of the season, posting a 1.42 earned run average with 212 strikeouts. Alongside her pitching dominance, she batted .489 and hammered 11 home runs plus 48 RBIs.

                                                                                In the two games against Lincoln Southwest, however, she allowed 17 hits and six home runs in what was described by her high school head coach Todd Petersen as the two worst games of her career.

                                                                                In an ensuing spring meeting, Bahl told her teammates, “We’re not going to let this happen ever again.”

                                                                                “She got hit pretty hard,” Petersen said. “We didn't necessarily help her as much as we should either as a team, and we got beat twice. … When the dust cleared, really the only conversation we had, she said ‘I’m gonna work harder than anybody, so that I never allow that to happen again.’”

                                                                                Alongside a heightened work ethic, which pushed her to become noticeably stronger, Bahl learned to become a better leader ahead of her junior season. Before the aforementioned championship series against Lincoln Southwest, Bahl’s complacency ended in failure. The right hander even had a conversation with Dubsky in a pitching lesson the night before the title game flexing her confidence.

                                                                                “They were going to play the next morning,” Dubsky said, “and she said yeah, ‘We got these guys’ and I said, ‘Man, I tell you what, they're a good team. Don’t take them for granted.’”

                                                                                Take them for granted she did, and Bahl paid the ultimate price. But moving past her sophomore shortcomings as a junior captain, she set the standard for the Monarchs to earn everything in practice, games and even studies.

                                                                                With championship aspirations the next season, Bahl never let up. That’s when failure was no longer an option for the ace, comparable to the same mentality Jordan carried in his career.

                                                                                During the first practice of Bahl’s junior year, the Monarchs welcomed a new transfer from Millard South High. Still reeling in the championship loss, Petersen was pushing conditioning, and the new player was opting out of the hardest drills.

                                                                                Unknown to Petersen at the time, Bahl approached the player and said, “How come when everything gets tough, you stop,” in front of the entire team. Immediately after, the player packed her bags and transferred back to her original school.

                                                                                Bahl’s drive was only furthered by the pain she felt from losing the state championship. Petersen believes the state title game loss was the turning point that catapulted Bahl’s high school career from great to legendary.

                                                                                The next two seasons, Bahl led the Monarchs to back-to-back state titles and avenged her loss to Lincoln Southwest during a tournament in 2019, finally overcoming her chief rival like Jordan eventually bested the bad boy Detroit Pistons.

                                                                                Bahl also compiled back-to-back Gatorade Nebraska Player of the Year awards, alongside the 2020-21 National Gatorade Player of the Year accolade during her senior season. She ended her time at Papillion LaVista with 0.10 and 0.15 earned run averages in her senior and junior seasons, respectively. She also posted a Nebraska state record of eight perfect games, alongside 14 no-hitters and a school record 56 shutouts.

                                                                                Bahl finished her final two seasons fulfilling her promise of never losing a state title game again and helped her team achieve 36-0 marks both years.

                                                                                “She bought more into the team, then even more,” Petersen said. “... I would say that was really a defining moment of her career, how she got to where she is now. I think that day (when she lost the championship) helped to get her to where she is.”

                                                                                Jordy seems to thrive in those situations'

                                                                                Gasso saw Bahl pacing in the dugout.

                                                                                After the freshman phenom had given up four earned runs in five innings, Oklahoma’s coach relieved her with sophomore right-hander Nicole May in hopes of clinging to a 5-4 lead in the sixth inning. May, however, struggled to anchor Oklahoma’s defense, allowing then-No. 17 Tennessee to take a 6-5 lead in the top of the seventh inning.

                                                                                With nearly 5,000 fans packing the stands in Palm Springs, California, the Sooners were trailing for the first time in the 2022 season. Bahl’s nervous strutting convinced Gasso to put her back in the circle.

                                                                                “She wanted to get back in because she didn't like how she walked off,” Gasso said. “I think that part of stepping into womanhood collegiately is throwing athletes in the fire and seeing what it looks like, whether they are successful or not. They're still having the experience of what it feels like under intense pressure, and Jordy seems to thrive in those situations.”

                                                                                After returning to the game, Bahl struck out five batters and gave up two more runs in two extra frames. Down 8-7 with two outs and runners on first and second in the top of the 10th inning, Bahl paced from the left side of the circle to the right as she typically does before each pitch. Then, loading up on a 1-2 count, Bahl zipped a strike past her opponent, ending the half inning and giving the Sooners a chance to win in the bottom frame.

                                                                                Her poise paid off when sophomore utility Jayda Coleman blasted a walk-off two-run home run to beat the Volunteers 9-8 in stunning fashion. Bahl finished the game with 16 strikeouts, the program’s most since former Sooners pitcher Giselle Juarez in 2019.

                                                                                On April 16, Bahl was in a similar situation against Big 12 conference foe Texas. Entering the game, Oklahoma was on a 38-0 NCAA record start to its season.

                                                                                Down 1-0, Bahl allowed the No. 18 Longhorns to take a 4-0 lead in the sixth inning off a three-RBI double. In probably her worst game of the season, she struck out nine batters in six innings but allowed four runs on eight hits in the 4-2 loss. That remains OU’s only defeat this season.

                                                                                Ultimately, Bahl wasn’t able to help Oklahoma survive like she did in the Tennessee game, but she has responded in subsequent outings. Since that loss, Bahl has won five straight games, allowed just eight hits, five runs and struck out 29 batters.

                                                                                As Oklahoma enters its most pivotal series of the season against the Cowgirls, Bahl’s tenacity and Jordan-like resilience will be pivotal to not only clinching the Big 12 regular season title, but also winning the WCWS back to back.

                                                                                Bahl has thrived under pressure, and Gasso will need that to continue if Oklahoma wants to clinch its sixth national championship.

                                                                                “The thing that's interesting about Jordy is just her ability to handle big moments, and it's almost like she hopes for them,” Gasso said. “There are times when there are bases loaded with nobody out, and something even clicks a little bit more for her like ‘There's no way you're going to score on me,’ attitude. That's what it looks like and what it feels like. She's built differently than any other freshman I've ever seen.”









                                                                                Comment


                                                                                  Originally posted by SoonernVolved View Post
                                                                                  https://twitter.com/OUDailySports/status/


                                                                                  OU softball: How family, fishing and failure fuels Jordy Bahl’s Michael Jordan-esque competitive fire

                                                                                  Jordy Bahl paced around the circle and shook her head in disgust.

                                                                                  OU’s star right-hander had just been called for an illegal pitch in the top of the first inning. Fired up, the freshman pitcher had one final chance to strike out UCLA’s Briana Perez on a 3-2 count and pass the first big test of her career.

                                                                                  Bahl tossed an offspeed pitch past Perez’s flailing bat and then glared at the home plate umpire while pumping her fist and shouting “Thank you blue!”

                                                                                  To those who know her best, the moment between pitches encapsulates how Bahl fuels herself in a sport where few can match her intensity. This season Bahl has posted a 0.96 earned run average and allowed just 59 hits in 123.2 innings pitched, while striking out 191 batters and becoming a finalist for USA Softball Player of the Year.

                                                                                  As the top five matchup against the Bruins dragged on, so did the ump’s illegal pitch calls against Bahl’s unorthodox crow hop wind-up. Bahl was not discouraged, however, and mowed down 13 more batters to complete No. 1 Oklahoma’s Feb. 12 win over No. 3 UCLA in the Mary Nutter Classic.

                                                                                  On a national stage, the 19-year-old former top-ranked recruit from Papillion, Nebraska, displayed the physical and mental tools fostered by her father, Dave Bahl. As a constant reminder of the killer mindset he instilled, she sports a pair of forearm tattoos that match Dave’s. Reflecting on those when she prepares to toe the rubber has helped make her indomitable in the circle.

                                                                                  On Bahl’s right forearm the number 98 is scribbled in a small, bold font. It’s the number she wears now and the same Dave donned as a college football player 34 years ago. On Bahl’s left wrist are the letters G-T-N, an abbreviation from the father and daughter’s favorite movie, “300,” in which a famed warrior leading troops into battle says, “Give them nothing, but take from them everything.”

                                                                                  Jordy and Dave’s bond extends to another legendary contender who manufactured motivation however possible — Michael Jordan. Dave grew up watching the Chicago Bulls standout as he dominated the NBA through the 1990s. Jordy came to idolize Jordan’s killer mindset as a child, and deepened that admiration when she watched “The Last Dance” Netflix documentary between games during a summer tournament in California.

                                                                                  Throughout the tournament, Bahl was compelled by Jordan’s journey to his sixth NBA championship. Specifically, she loved how he played with a chip on his shoulder. Bahl already carried the same fiery edge and the documentary drove her to heighten and harness it, using it to elevate her game as Jordan did.

                                                                                  Oklahoma pitcher Jordy Bahl watched "The Last Dance," a Netflix documentary about Michael Jordan, during a break from a summer travel tournament.

                                                                                  Photo courtesy of Dave Bahl
                                                                                  “She was enamored by just the insane competitiveness, and how (Jordan) would make the game personal,” Dave Bahl said of his daughter’s reaction to the documentary. “He was at his best when it was personal. Some of those rivalries were just personal anyway because of prior history, but sometimes he would have to go as far as to create a reason for it to be personal.”

                                                                                  Fast forward over eight months, 46 games into her freshman campaign with OU, and Bahl still carries the same combative mindset that made Jordan arguably the greatest player of all time.

                                                                                  Throughout this season, Bahl has tried to build an advantage over her opponents and even her OU teammates, like college softball’s home run queen Jocelyn Alo, who she regularly battles in practice.

                                                                                  The young pitcher even exhibits similar nervous tendencies as Jordan, who famously flailed his tongue in clutch moments. Bahl gnaws on her bottom lip before and during games, drilling cold sores into the edges of her mouth. Two days before the Sooners’ matchup against then-No. 8 Kentucky on March 22, OU’s training staff even prescribed Bahl a numbing agent because the sores were so painful.

                                                                                  “She’s working on trying to figure out ways to always have that edge,” Dave said. “I guess that's what you call a coping mechanism or something for her stress and anxiety.”

                                                                                  This weekend, Bahl and OU (45-1, 14-1 Big 12) face OU/OSU rival No. 7 Oklahoma State (38-9, 14-1 Big 12) in a three-game series for the Big 12 regular season title, leading into the postseason and the Sooners’ bid for a second straight Women’s College World Series championship. As her first year in Norman nears its climax, Bahl’s ability to elevate herself as Jordan did will be one of the deciding factors in Oklahoma’s national championship defense.

                                                                                  As the 2022 season continues, OU coach Patty Gasso is hunting for ways to enhance Bahl’s greatness.

                                                                                  “I just have never seen anything like her,” Gasso said. “When she got onto our field, I was just still figuring her out. I'm trying to feed her competition. She wants it, and I want to feed into it. I'm really trying to do a good job at that practice.”

                                                                                  ‘Her family means everything’

                                                                                  At 7 on a July morning, Bahl slid downstairs to her basement, flicked on the lights of her family’s home gym and started the morning workout routine she committed to at the COVID-19 pandemic’s outset.

                                                                                  The room, built by Dave, served as a training area for Jordy, who is now 19, and her brothers Bryson, Broden and Hayden, who are 15, 17 and 21, respectively. Along with a row of weights, benches and workout machines, a long hallway ends at a block wall scribbled with Sharpie Xs, dedicated for target practice in Bahl’s makeshift bullpen.

                                                                                  Broden’s bedroom is also in the basement, and after climbing out of bed on three hours of sleep after a night of video games, he scolded Jordy for waking him up with her loud country music. Fed up, the pair hurled insults back and forth, before Broden issued a challenge.

                                                                                  “I bet you can’t beat me in a race,” he said.

                                                                                  Immediately, they sped outside to set up orange, plastic cones for a 40-yard sprint. Awakened by the commotion, Dave surveyed the impromptu race from the front porch.

                                                                                  “Broden absolutely smoked her,” Dave said. “She doesn’t like to lose, so that was already 10 degrees of ugly right there. So, then Jordy said, ‘Well fine, I bet I can beat you in a long-distance race.’”

                                                                                  After mapping out a two-block path for the second contest, Broden again won. Jordy, tapping into her Jordan-like pettiness, didn’t talk to her brother for nearly three weeks.

                                                                                  Those races notwithstanding, Jordy usually holds her own against her brothers. Whether it was two-touch football — which quickly escalated to tackling — wiffle ball or pickup basketball, she always challenged them.

                                                                                  “We go at each other pretty hard,” Hayden said. “Most of the time it ends up not ending too well because we go a little too hard. It’s just (that) competitive nature. It's in all of us, and it's been a little more difficult on her, being the only girl, because she's got three brothers to deal with, who maybe take it a little too far sometimes. But, she's always held her own in every regard.”

                                                                                  Hayden formerly pitched for Nebraska-Omaha before retiring due to injury. Broden and Bryson are standouts on Papillion LaVista High School’s football and basketball teams, respectively.

                                                                                  The origin of the siblings’ competitive nature lies with Dave, though. He played defensive line for NAIA Doane College in Crete, Nebraska, and is now a firefighter.

                                                                                  Following 24-hour shifts at the station, Dave would get off at 7 a.m. and take Jordy to pitching lessons from age 7 to 16. There, Darren Dubsky, Jordy’s pitching coach for 11 years, directed her technique as Dave crouched 43-feet away, catching and recording notes for more practice at home.

                                                                                  Dave also primarily helped his daughter with her illegal pitch troubles due to her plant foot leaping off the ground as she hurls her body into her windup. For months, the pair dug trenches in the ground to catch Jordy’s foot and ensure it stayed planted. If she hopped over a trench, Dave would call an illegal pitch, making her try again.

                                                                                  Dave’s commitment to his kids runs deep, so much that his only listed hobby in his firefighter profile is “raising four children.” His efforts seep directly into their killer mindset, fueling competition between the three.

                                                                                  “I noticed that she got a lot of that mental toughness from her family,” Dubsky said. “She just snowballs, and things tend to snowball the right way with her.”

                                                                                  While Dave largely nurtured Jordy’s competitiveness, he also has helped her develop a persona beyond softball. After losing the high school state championship in 2018, Bahl struggled because she was so singularly focused to that point.

                                                                                  “She started to have some difficulty with her identity,” Dave said. “At the time she was just a softball player. That's all people really knew her for and even dealt with some of that in her own family. (There were even) relatives that just couldn't be around her without talking softball.”

                                                                                  Instantly, Dave looked to the things he enjoyed growing up — hunting, fishing and exploring the wilderness — as an outlet for his daughter’s emotions. Quickly, she started adopting those hobbies as an escape from the diamond.

                                                                                  After taking up fishing with her dad, Bahl started to make a routine of it with some of her Nebraska Gold travel ball teammates before practices. Then, she’d trek from the lake to the Millard United Sports Championship Center in cowboy boots and a muddied uniform to dice up her teammates in the circle.

                                                                                  Bahl also liked watching the Nebraska sunsets with her family. Now, being 468 miles south of her hometown, Bahl continues the hobbies her father started her on. She keeps a set of fishing poles in the bed of her red Ford F-150 with camo seats if she ever wants to cast a line with her Sooners teammates.

                                                                                  Being on the biggest stage despite her freshness in college softball, Bahl is continuing to learn how to reel in her determination and cast it out at the appropriate times. But, that wouldn’t be possible without the lessons she learned from her father and family.

                                                                                  “I think the family was probably the last puzzle piece that needed to take place in order for her to be great,” Dubsky said. “I think with Jordy, she feels in the back of her mind that she has such a close relationship with her family. … She knows that no matter what in life, everything's going to be fine. Her family means everything.”

                                                                                  ‘She got hit pretty hard’

                                                                                  With two outs remaining in the bottom of the sixth inning, Bahl peered from the dugout bench as her Papillion La Vista High School teammate waited for a pitch.

                                                                                  With parents screaming in the background, Lincoln Southwest’s pitcher delivered and induced a groundout, stealing the 2018 Nebraska Class A Softball State Championship from Bahl’s squad.

                                                                                  Entering the state title series, Bahl and the Monarchs were 34-0 before dropping both contests to Lincoln Southwest.

                                                                                  A sophomore at the time, Bahl glared at the opposing team as they rushed to first base and hoisted the sterling trophy, a memory that burned inside her mind for most of her high school career.

                                                                                  Bahl had led the Monarchs well for most of the season, posting a 1.42 earned run average with 212 strikeouts. Alongside her pitching dominance, she batted .489 and hammered 11 home runs plus 48 RBIs.

                                                                                  In the two games against Lincoln Southwest, however, she allowed 17 hits and six home runs in what was described by her high school head coach Todd Petersen as the two worst games of her career.

                                                                                  In an ensuing spring meeting, Bahl told her teammates, “We’re not going to let this happen ever again.”

                                                                                  “She got hit pretty hard,” Petersen said. “We didn't necessarily help her as much as we should either as a team, and we got beat twice. … When the dust cleared, really the only conversation we had, she said ‘I’m gonna work harder than anybody, so that I never allow that to happen again.’”

                                                                                  Alongside a heightened work ethic, which pushed her to become noticeably stronger, Bahl learned to become a better leader ahead of her junior season. Before the aforementioned championship series against Lincoln Southwest, Bahl’s complacency ended in failure. The right hander even had a conversation with Dubsky in a pitching lesson the night before the title game flexing her confidence.

                                                                                  “They were going to play the next morning,” Dubsky said, “and she said yeah, ‘We got these guys’ and I said, ‘Man, I tell you what, they're a good team. Don’t take them for granted.’”

                                                                                  Take them for granted she did, and Bahl paid the ultimate price. But moving past her sophomore shortcomings as a junior captain, she set the standard for the Monarchs to earn everything in practice, games and even studies.

                                                                                  With championship aspirations the next season, Bahl never let up. That’s when failure was no longer an option for the ace, comparable to the same mentality Jordan carried in his career.

                                                                                  During the first practice of Bahl’s junior year, the Monarchs welcomed a new transfer from Millard South High. Still reeling in the championship loss, Petersen was pushing conditioning, and the new player was opting out of the hardest drills.

                                                                                  Unknown to Petersen at the time, Bahl approached the player and said, “How come when everything gets tough, you stop,” in front of the entire team. Immediately after, the player packed her bags and transferred back to her original school.

                                                                                  Bahl’s drive was only furthered by the pain she felt from losing the state championship. Petersen believes the state title game loss was the turning point that catapulted Bahl’s high school career from great to legendary.

                                                                                  The next two seasons, Bahl led the Monarchs to back-to-back state titles and avenged her loss to Lincoln Southwest during a tournament in 2019, finally overcoming her chief rival like Jordan eventually bested the bad boy Detroit Pistons.

                                                                                  Bahl also compiled back-to-back Gatorade Nebraska Player of the Year awards, alongside the 2020-21 National Gatorade Player of the Year accolade during her senior season. She ended her time at Papillion LaVista with 0.10 and 0.15 earned run averages in her senior and junior seasons, respectively. She also posted a Nebraska state record of eight perfect games, alongside 14 no-hitters and a school record 56 shutouts.

                                                                                  Bahl finished her final two seasons fulfilling her promise of never losing a state title game again and helped her team achieve 36-0 marks both years.

                                                                                  “She bought more into the team, then even more,” Petersen said. “... I would say that was really a defining moment of her career, how she got to where she is now. I think that day (when she lost the championship) helped to get her to where she is.”

                                                                                  Jordy seems to thrive in those situations'

                                                                                  Gasso saw Bahl pacing in the dugout.

                                                                                  After the freshman phenom had given up four earned runs in five innings, Oklahoma’s coach relieved her with sophomore right-hander Nicole May in hopes of clinging to a 5-4 lead in the sixth inning. May, however, struggled to anchor Oklahoma’s defense, allowing then-No. 17 Tennessee to take a 6-5 lead in the top of the seventh inning.

                                                                                  With nearly 5,000 fans packing the stands in Palm Springs, California, the Sooners were trailing for the first time in the 2022 season. Bahl’s nervous strutting convinced Gasso to put her back in the circle.

                                                                                  “She wanted to get back in because she didn't like how she walked off,” Gasso said. “I think that part of stepping into womanhood collegiately is throwing athletes in the fire and seeing what it looks like, whether they are successful or not. They're still having the experience of what it feels like under intense pressure, and Jordy seems to thrive in those situations.”

                                                                                  After returning to the game, Bahl struck out five batters and gave up two more runs in two extra frames. Down 8-7 with two outs and runners on first and second in the top of the 10th inning, Bahl paced from the left side of the circle to the right as she typically does before each pitch. Then, loading up on a 1-2 count, Bahl zipped a strike past her opponent, ending the half inning and giving the Sooners a chance to win in the bottom frame.

                                                                                  Her poise paid off when sophomore utility Jayda Coleman blasted a walk-off two-run home run to beat the Volunteers 9-8 in stunning fashion. Bahl finished the game with 16 strikeouts, the program’s most since former Sooners pitcher Giselle Juarez in 2019.

                                                                                  On April 16, Bahl was in a similar situation against Big 12 conference foe Texas. Entering the game, Oklahoma was on a 38-0 NCAA record start to its season.

                                                                                  Down 1-0, Bahl allowed the No. 18 Longhorns to take a 4-0 lead in the sixth inning off a three-RBI double. In probably her worst game of the season, she struck out nine batters in six innings but allowed four runs on eight hits in the 4-2 loss. That remains OU’s only defeat this season.

                                                                                  Ultimately, Bahl wasn’t able to help Oklahoma survive like she did in the Tennessee game, but she has responded in subsequent outings. Since that loss, Bahl has won five straight games, allowed just eight hits, five runs and struck out 29 batters.

                                                                                  As Oklahoma enters its most pivotal series of the season against the Cowgirls, Bahl’s tenacity and Jordan-like resilience will be pivotal to not only clinching the Big 12 regular season title, but also winning the WCWS back to back.

                                                                                  Bahl has thrived under pressure, and Gasso will need that to continue if Oklahoma wants to clinch its sixth national championship.

                                                                                  “The thing that's interesting about Jordy is just her ability to handle big moments, and it's almost like she hopes for them,” Gasso said. “There are times when there are bases loaded with nobody out, and something even clicks a little bit more for her like ‘There's no way you're going to score on me,’ attitude. That's what it looks like and what it feels like. She's built differently than any other freshman I've ever seen.”








                                                                                  Her body language was a tiny concerning in the inning where the ball bounced off the 3b bag. Almost like the stress was getting her. Maybe not being in a bunch of tight games will do that. That said, she is soooo good. I wondered if she could get good teams out consistently without relying on the strikeout. She's showing she can throw to contact. She had good control last night too. Not working behind much.

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                                                                                    the umps were 2-1 on their reviews. The curiously frustrating thing about it...the most obvious review (Boone being safe at first) was the one that they muffed. I mean, it was OBVIOUS. I can only assume they didn't see the same replay that the rest of the world witnessed on TV?! Either way, 7-1 Sooners !!

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                                                                                      More reasons we gotta get out of this conference ASAP

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                                                                                        I can't imagine how an osu fan could be causing problems?


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                                                                                          Originally posted by gratefulRed View Post
                                                                                          the umps were 2-1 on their reviews. The curiously frustrating thing about it...the most obvious review (Boone being safe at first) was the one that they muffed. I mean, it was OBVIOUS. I can only assume they didn't see the same replay that the rest of the world witnessed on TV?! Either way, 7-1 Sooners !!
                                                                                          Lyons at 3b was the most obvious, but yeah, NO DOUBT Boone was safe. I was stunned. It really wasn't all that close. BTW, I hate the review at 2b...that's been an understood out for years. I get that it was the right call by the book, but it just seemed nitpicky.

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                                                                                            Originally posted by Section31 View Post

                                                                                            Lyons at 3b was the most obvious, but yeah, NO DOUBT Boone was safe. I was stunned. It really wasn't all that close. BTW, I hate the review at 2b...that's been an understood out for years. I get that it was the right call by the book, but it just seemed nitpicky.
                                                                                            Yea. Her foot was just too far from the bag. In my baseball days, the umps would let that go if the fielder lifted their foot just a tad early to avoid the runner who was sliding into their foot/leg (call it an out). Allow kids a little leeway to protect themselves. Which was the case…in my baseball days they would have called it an out just like the field ump did.

                                                                                            I think it got overturned because we have replay….and her feet were just too far off the bag to do anything else.

                                                                                            As clear as it was and as hyped as I was that she was safe….by this morning I would have come around to the fact that historical they rule that an out…without replay that’s always an out….unless she never got her foot to the bag to begin with (which wasn’t the case).

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                                                                                              https://twitter.com/OU_Softball/status/

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                                                                                                https://twitter.com/OU_Softball/status/

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                                                                                                  https://twitter.com/OU_Softball/status/

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                                                                                                    Originally posted by Me And My Butt View Post

                                                                                                    Yea. Her foot was just too far from the bag. In my baseball days, the umps would let that go if the fielder lifted their foot just a tad early to avoid the runner who was sliding into their foot/leg (call it an out). Allow kids a little leeway to protect themselves. Which was the case…in my baseball days they would have called it an out just like the field ump did.

                                                                                                    I think it got overturned because we have replay….and her feet were just too far off the bag to do anything else.

                                                                                                    As clear as it was and as hyped as I was that she was safe….by this morning I would have come around to the fact that historical they rule that an out…without replay that’s always an out….unless she never got her foot to the bag to begin with (which wasn’t the case).
                                                                                                    Totally understand that typical call but did she ever touch the bag at all? I think that might have been an issue as well but I didn't really think to look back to verify. Just assumed she never touched the bag at all, with or without the ball.

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                                                                                                      Originally posted by RockFlagandEagle View Post

                                                                                                      Totally understand that typical call but did she ever touch the bag at all? I think that might have been an issue as well but I didn't really think to look back to verify. Just assumed she never touched the bag at all, with or without the ball.
                                                                                                      I don't know about MAMB, but my comment was more around, "they NEVER have touched 2b...or at least not a lot of the time...it's just understood"...well, those days - with replay involved - are gone. I bet you NEVER see MLB allow for review of that call. :)

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